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Tuesday, January 23
 

9:00am

Coffee and registration
Box Office opens at 9:00

Speakers
avatar for PIDapalooza Organizers

PIDapalooza Organizers

PIDapalooza
Roadies from California Digital Library, ORCID, Crossref, and DataCite


Tuesday January 23, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
Box Office / Concession Stand

9:30am

Opening Act: Lighting the eternal (persistent) flame
Lighting the eternal (persistent) flame

Speakers
avatar for PIDapalooza Organizers

PIDapalooza Organizers

PIDapalooza
Roadies from California Digital Library, ORCID, Crossref, and DataCite


Tuesday January 23, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
Main Stage

10:00am

String theory - tying more permanent, FAIRer knots with PIDs
This session will bring up (again) some of the issues from this paper http://cs.unibo.it/save-sd/2017/papers/html/philipson-savesd2017.html (slides at https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.556984), that is, making PIDs more Findable and Accessible by means of e.g. distributed custodianship, Interoperable and Re-usable by assuring that they are also more *validatable* (e.g. through fixed string-lengths, restricted character sets, with embedded 'semantics'). Global uniqueness could be achieved without having unduly long strings through a modular design, in which different bits and pieces of the string have dedicated semantic content.

Speakers
avatar for Joakim Philipson

Joakim Philipson

Stockholms Universitet


Tuesday January 23, 2018 10:00am - 10:30am
Stage 2

10:00am

Data Publishing: PID adoption stories from the repository frontline
Dash (Daniella Lowenberg), Dataverse (Gustavo Durand), & Figshare (Mark Hahnel) would like to discuss different experiences and perspectives on PIDs in data publishing from the repository perspective. Our 15 minute experience share out will cover: user interfaces to engage researchers in using PIDs in data publishing and how we automagically find PIDs for researchers so that any data they are making public is in addition to the stuff they have already made public (perhaps unknowingly, in many silos). We hope to engage the audience with their experiences within data publishing or other aspects of the research lifecycle that can give insight to more effective PIDs in data publishing.
Note: Dryad was also interested in joining but were unable to attend.

Speakers
avatar for Gustavo Durand

Gustavo Durand

Dataverse Technical Lead, IQSS, Harvard University
avatar for Mark Hahnel

Mark Hahnel

CEO, figshare
avatar for Daniella Lowenberg

Daniella Lowenberg

California Digital Library


Tuesday January 23, 2018 10:00am - 10:30am
Stage 1

10:00am

Jupyter and PIDs
Jupyter notebooks are increasingly being used in the computational sciences, for data analysis and storytelling, but they can also be an invaluable tool for working with PIDs in libraries. Interacting with services such as ORCID and Zenodo, Jupyter’s step-by-step process offers an iterative approach to exploring and analyzing these datasets for reporting and curation purposes. In addition, the notebooks can be shared, allowing workflows to be reproduced, analysis remixed and shared again. This talk will demonstrate Jupyter notebok-PID uses in the library context.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Erdmann

Chris Erdmann

Chief Strategist for Research Collaboration, Libraries, North Carolina State University


Tuesday January 23, 2018 10:00am - 10:30am
Stage 3

10:30am

Which PID should we use?
With so many to choose from, sometimes deciding on which persistent identifier scheme to use can be difficult. At the Publications Office of the EU we are responsible for identifying content coming out of the EU institutions. We are a registration agency for established international identifiers such as ISBN, ISSN and DOI as well as providing support for our own EU-specific persistent URI scheme. When we received a request from one of our clients for help in identifying the content of a historical archive, we asked ourselves the question: what would be best in this specific case: the doi or our own persistent URI scheme, data.europa.eu? So we have decided to launch a small study to compare the two approaches according to the requirements of this specific case. The results will be known by the end of the year and PIDapalooza would be the ideal forum to share the conclusions.

Speakers
avatar for Carol Riccalton

Carol Riccalton

Publications Office of the European Union


Tuesday January 23, 2018 10:30am - 11:00am
Stage 3

10:30am

Do researchers need to care about PID systems?
A survey across 1400 scientists in the natural sciences and engineering across Germany conducted in 2016 revealed that although more than 70 % of the researchers are using DOIs for journal publications, less than 10% use DOIs for research data. To the question of why they are not using DOIs more than half (56%) answered that they don’t know about the option to use DOIs for other publications (datasets, conference papers etc.) Therefore it is not surprising that the majority (57 %) stated that they had no need for DOI counselling services. 40% of the questioned researchers need more information and almost 30% cannot see a benefit.
Publishers have been using PID systems for articles for years, and the DOI registration and citation are a natural part of the standard publication workflow. With the new digital age, the possibilities to publishing digital research objects beyond articles are bigger than ever – but the respective infrastructure providers are still struggling to provide integrated PID services.
Out of more than 1900 repository systems listed in re3data.org, only 702 (less than 37 %!) state to provide a PID service, with 444 of them using the DOI system. Infrastructure providers need to learn from publishers and offer integrated PID services, complementing existing workflows, using researcher’s vocabulary to support usability and promotion. Sell the benefit and enable researchers to focus on what they are best at: Do research (and not worry about the rest)!

Presentation: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1158381

Speakers
avatar for Angelina Kraft

Angelina Kraft

Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB)


Tuesday January 23, 2018 10:30am - 11:00am
Stage 2

10:30am

We are getting there: how RCUK is trying to link up Org IDs
Research Councils UK would welcome a discussion at PIDapalooza 2018 regarding the linking of organisational identifiers. Currently RCUK use a non-standard identifier in our internal systems for organisations. As we head into the formation of UK Research and Innovation (a UK organisation which brings together the 7 UK research councils, InnovateUK and a new organisation Research England), we have a growing requirement to record information from academic institutions to private sector companies and have an ambition to use a persistent identifier for these. We would like to discuss linking legal organisational (entity) identifiers e.g. companies house to other identifier standards like ISNI and beyond. This could potentially enable further interoperability in the sector reducing burden on academic staff applying for funding and admin burdens.

Speakers
avatar for Ashley Moore

Ashley Moore

Head of Analysis, Research Councils UK - RCUK



Tuesday January 23, 2018 10:30am - 11:00am
Stage 1

11:00am

Break
Time for posters and socializing

Tuesday January 23, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
Box Office / Concession Stand

11:30am

PIDs in Wikidata
I have the scars, here's how I got them. Working with a disparate and sometimes volatile volunteer community; soliciting and processing data donations from professional organisations; correcting the experts; Wikidata IDs as PIDs; Wikidata as the hub of all PIDS; when is a PID not a PID?

Speakers
avatar for Andy Mabbett

Andy Mabbett

Wikimedian in Residence at ORCID & elsewhere, Wikipedia editor since 2003 and Wikidata editor since its 2012 inception.


Tuesday January 23, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Stage 2

11:30am

Making groups a first-class abstraction of PIDs
There's a lot of discussion about PIDs for groups right now, and different discussions include different ideas of groups. Some talk about groups of people, and some talk about groups of objects more generally.  We probably don't want to set up lots of new types of PIDs for each kind of group, but what else can we do?

In this session, we'll talk about making groups a first-class abstraction of PIDs. PIDs now have a single abstraction: that of a naming authority and a local namespace. Groups can be supported in PIDs today by using the relationType, but this is buried, not a high-level goal. If we had the concept of groups in PIDs, this would be useful in organization IDs (an organization is really a group, perhaps with a hierarchy), software IDs (software projects are groups of software releases), and data IDs (data collections and data sets are groups of data or data streams, and data streams are also groups of data).

Can we change the underlying assumptions about PIDs at this point?  Should we?  Let's talk, and figure it out.

(slides from this session are available at https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.5812881.v2 

Speakers
avatar for Daniel S. Katz

Daniel S. Katz

Assistant Dir. for Scientific Software & Applications, NCSA; Research Assoc. Prof., CS, ECE, iSchool, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign



Tuesday January 23, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Stage 1

11:30am

PIDS in Practice: Peer Review
With Crossref’s late 2017 introduction of support for peer review reports and other review outputs, such as referee reports, decision letters, and author responses, PIDs - for people, places, and things - are now being used throughout the peer review process. This new functionality will is aimed at enabling better citation, recognition, and discoverability of peer reviews, as well as increasing transparency of the peer review process. This session will describe how PIDs have been integrated into the process for journal articles, highlight opportunities and challenges around adoption and use, and raise the question about what is needed for other forms of peer review, such as grant application, conference abstract submission, and annotation. We will present updated statistics on uptake of ORCID and Crossref’s peer review functionality and brainstorm ways to increase future adoption through community engagement and evangelization to researchers and their organizations.

Speakers
avatar for Alice Meadows

Alice Meadows

Director, Community Engagement & Support, ORCID
avatar for Ed Pentz

Ed Pentz

Executive Director, Crossref
Ed Pentz became Crossref's first Executive Director when the organization was founded in 2000 and manages all aspects of the organization to ensure that it fulfills its mission to make research outputs easy to find, cite, link and assess. Ed was Chair of the ORCID board of directors... Read More →


Tuesday January 23, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Stage 3

12:00pm

free, open data metrics for all
The Make Data Count (MDC) project aims to develop data-level-metrics and elevate data as a first class research output. Data usage metrics rely on persistent identifiers, but usage is different based on content type. DOIs are used for both publications and datasets but the underlying ways of tracking usage are different. Recognizing that metrics around PIDs are community specific, the MDC team has looked at the various community attributions around PIDs and are tackling this issue through developing standards and facilitating community involvement to drive adoption of data-level-metrics.

Speakers
avatar for John Chodacki

John Chodacki

Director, University of California Curation Center, California Digital Library - CDL
avatar for Trisha Cruse

Trisha Cruse

Director, DataCite
avatar for Martin Fenner

Martin Fenner

Technical Director, DataCite
avatar for Daniella Lowenberg

Daniella Lowenberg

California Digital Library


Tuesday January 23, 2018 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Stage 1

12:00pm

[IDs/Repos] are doing it wrong: a debate
The future of open science lies in a distributed network of resources bolstered by core research infrastructures. Resources are created, housed and preserved at every level in the research ecosystem, but repositories, whether subject or institutional, are a crucial network guaranteeing access to and preservation of precious scholarly resources. Ensuring that these resources are discoverable, reusable and bringing recognition for their creators is at the heart of the repository community's drives to improve their services. Bringing PIDs into the heart of repository workflows and delivering their potential to increase the effectiveness and openness of research communication is essential. By marrying established PIDs, such as ORCID iDs, to popular repository platforms, like DSPace and Fedora, we can leverage the power of both networks, adding new PIDs to repositories and making more of the connections between resources visible. In this session, we will discuss the ways that repository and identifier systems need to evolve to improve discovery and reuse. Representatives from Duraspace and ORCID will debate the ways that their communities are working together to embed PIDs in repository workflows, and present their competing priorities and visions for standards and best practices for identifiers in the repository space.

Speakers
avatar for Michele Mennielli

Michele Mennielli

International Membership and Partnership Manager, Duraspace


Tuesday January 23, 2018 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Stage 3

12:00pm

RAiDs are like handles for projects
The DLCF Project in Brisbane Australia has developed a Research Activity ID for projects called RAiD. RAiD is a simple handle ID with an attached Data Management Record which holds minimal metadata for the project in the form of PIDs for workflows, tools, processes and people associated with the project. Integrated systems can use the RAiD and DMR content for automating access and allocations for storage and virtual tools while recording the access and outputs from their use. RAiD as a project PID removes the need for manual processes to access eResearch infrastructure and puts the research project at the centre of the Research Data Management process to improve line of sight through the entire data life cycle and its components.

Speakers

Tuesday January 23, 2018 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Stage 2

12:30pm

Lunch
Time for posters and socializing

Tuesday January 23, 2018 12:30pm - 1:15pm
Box Office / Concession Stand

1:15pm

As a [biologist] I want to [reuse and remix data] so that I can [do my research]
Most researchers do not spend much time thinking about persistent identifiers - they just want to get on with their work. PID infrastructure for all things scholarly promises to deliver on seamless integration of research resources, as well as make reporting and analysis of research outcomes more streamlined. To realise this vision, the good news is: we are not starting from scratch. To realise this vision, the bad news is: we are not starting from scratch. How can we build coherent and functional PID infrastructure in the midst of a rich ecosystem that is constantly growing in scale and diversity? In this talk I will give a perspective on life with and without PIDs in the life sciences, outlining some of the learning from the journey thus far and some hopes for the future.

Speakers

Tuesday January 23, 2018 1:15pm - 2:00pm
Main Stage

2:00pm

Adventures in rolling your own persistent identifier system.
What are the challenges and opportunities of designing promulgating your own persistent identifiers? For the last 3 years we have been actively providing, resolving, and promulgating Research Resource Identifiers (RRIDs). Come to hear tales the woes and triumphs of managing a persistent identifier system and wrangling PIDs in the wild! Learn what you need to do early on to avoid becoming a victim of your own success! We will recount our lessons learned from building the RRID system and working with editors, publishers, users, and developers. We will use these lessons as the basis for lively conversation about common challenges that face any PID system. Finally we will explore opportunities for overcoming common challenges (such as crawling the literature) facing many members of PID community.

Speakers
avatar for Tom Gillespie

Tom Gillespie

UC San Diego


Tuesday January 23, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Stage 1

2:00pm

All about that BASE
This conversation will be about how DOIs and ORCID iDs only recently entered BASE, one of the largest academic search engines, which happens to be non-commercial. BASE harvests bibliographic metadata via OAI-PMH from thousands of publication repositories – each of which has its own idea about Dublin Core, the lowest common denominator of metadata formats. So we normalize the data from each repository. Authors have been able to claim their own publications in BASE since mid-2017 by connecting them to their ORCID iD. It is an open research question how this linkage information could percolate back to the source repositories. Suggestions welcome!

Speakers
avatar for Christian Pietsch

Christian Pietsch

Bielefeld University


Tuesday January 23, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Stage 3

2:00pm

What IS means for PIDS?
ISO/TC46/SC9, the ISO technical subcommittee on identification and description, is developing a technical report on guiding principles for the development of ISO identifiers. The working group is expected to produce a draft by May, and a discussion among the PID community would be valuable input into the process.

Speakers
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, NISO
Standards. Standards. Standards. Wine. Standards. Standards. Standards.


Tuesday January 23, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Stage 2

2:30pm

How Portugal tackles Org IDs
This presentation aims to describe the Portuguese approach to manage organizational identifiers within the national/international ecosystem of research information system. It describes the goals, methodology , architecture and use cases of how bridge identifiers, in the case ISNI and Ringgold, have helped to break information systems silos providing added value to the stakeholders. The Org Ids project is part of PTCRIS (www.ptcris.pt) program which aims to define standards and build infrastructures that ensure the integration of information systems supporting scientific activity into a single, coherent and integrated ecosystem.

Speakers

Tuesday January 23, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Stage 3

2:30pm

Unidentifiable identifiers (and other perils of actually trying to build clever tools using PIDs)
Developers love PIDs! They provide trustworthy, centralized, reliable sources of information that are always up to date, which allows us to make better, faster applications that play nicely with others. But sometimes it’s not so easy to integrate PIDs. Without a central registry to provide current, machine-readable information about which PIDs are out there, their status, their format and their metadata APIs, integrating a broad range of PIDs into an application is a formidable challenge. For example, at ORCID, several staff members have been working for months to compile a comprehensive list of PID types for research outputs for use in our application interface, and, in some cases, we’ve resorted to emailing individuals at various organizations just to find the correct format for a particular PID. This session will discuss some of the challenges that application developers face in integrating a full range of PIDs, workarounds that we’re currently using, and the great joy that a centralized PID registry would bring.

Moderators
avatar for ORCID

ORCID

ORCID

Speakers

Tuesday January 23, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Stage 1

2:30pm

OrgID Update
Update from the Org ID project

Speakers
avatar for John Chodacki

John Chodacki

Director, University of California Curation Center, California Digital Library - CDL
avatar for Trisha Cruse

Trisha Cruse

Director, DataCite
avatar for Laure Haak

Laure Haak

Executive Director, ORCID
I care about effective infrastructures for supporting open research, scholarship, and innovation. Talk to me about persistent identifiers, researcher involvement in managing their own information, ensuring credit for a wide range of contributions, and privacy. Or the Packers... Read More →
avatar for Ed Pentz

Ed Pentz

Executive Director, Crossref
Ed Pentz became Crossref's first Executive Director when the organization was founded in 2000 and manages all aspects of the organization to ensure that it fulfills its mission to make research outputs easy to find, cite, link and assess. Ed was Chair of the ORCID board of directors... Read More →


Tuesday January 23, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Stage 2

3:00pm

Break
Time for posters and socializing

Tuesday January 23, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Box Office / Concession Stand

3:30pm

PIDs, Information Types and Collections - a Research Data Framework
PIDs are a requirement for reliable research data reuse and data sharing. Standardized PID information types are valuable for the parametrization of data management workflows. And building collection is the natural way to reassemble previously established research data as source for new scientific results. These three together provide a lightweight, but rather comprehensive, interoperable research data framework across sites. This Framework becomes interoperable across sites and PID systems with the PID system agnostic RDA-definition of collections, and with the standardization of PID information types given by emerging Data Type Registries. This session will show the interdependencies of these concepts, describe the necessary technology to provide such an interoperable research data framework and discuss use cases.

Speakers
avatar for Ulrich Schwardmann

Ulrich Schwardmann

University of Göttingen


Tuesday January 23, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Stage 2

3:30pm

Twenty Years of PID Discussion: Are We There Yet?
This would be a variation on a talk I gave a year ago to a PID workshop in Garching. Twenty plus years later and we are still discussing the topic. Seems easy enough, so what is left? I can take us back to the early 90s and show what has changed and what hasn't and what is left.

Speakers
avatar for Larry Lannom

Larry Lannom

VP, CNRI


Tuesday January 23, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Stage 1

3:30pm

Taken for granted: The first rule of grant IDs is that they should not be called “grant IDs.”
Research is supported in a variety of ways- through grants, endowments, secondments, loans use of premises/equipment and even crowd-funding. In any of these cases, it is important to be able to link researchers and research outputs to details about the sources of support. This is true for prosaic reasons- to understand ROI, to map the competitive landscape, to ensure that mandates are fulfilled, to avoid double payment. But it is also true for epistemic reasons- understanding how research was funded can help contextualise that research, and help expose potential conflicts of interest or specific agendas.

We already have the Open Funder Registry which at least provides a coarse mapping between research and funders, but it is becoming clear that we need more fine-grained mapping directly to information about the kind of support that was provided. Crossref is working with DataCite and ORCID to build off the work we did on the Open Funder Registry and create an interoperable PID that will map to information about how funders support specific research. This talk will describe what we’ve learned so-far and how we plan to proceed. Hint- don’t call them “grant IDs.”

Moderators
avatar for Crossref

Crossref

Crossref

Speakers
avatar for Geoffrey Bilder

Geoffrey Bilder

Director of Strategic Initiatives, Crossref
Geoffrey Bilder is Director of Strategic Initiatives at Crossref, where he has led the technical development and launch of a number of industry initiatives including Similarity Check, Crossmark, ORCID and the Open Funder Registry. He co-founded Brown University's Scholarly Technology... Read More →


Tuesday January 23, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Stage 3

4:00pm

How preservation can happen without holding local copies
Content-addressable identification of scholarly resources enables new, post-custodial methods for achieving sustainable persistence of the scholarly record. Instead of continued reliance on traditional notions of centralized custodial management, post-custodial stewardship focuses on applying meaningful curatorial services to resources wherever they most naturally reside. In essence, it replaces the constraining necessity to *hold* content locally with an open-ended ability to *reference* it freely and actionably. This requires a robust infrastructure for global identification of scholarly assets through massively-distributed content-addressable solutions like IPFS or Dat.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Abrams

Stephen Abrams

Associate Director, UC Curation Center, California Digital Library


Tuesday January 23, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Stage 3

4:00pm

What questions can PIDs answer?
Metadata are the structured and standard subset of the documentation that is required to understand scientific datasets. Identifiers are the connections between these two worlds and make it possible for users to get the information they need to understand the data they discover. Let’s explore some questions that these identifiers can answer.

Speakers
avatar for Ted Habermann

Ted Habermann

Metadata 2020
I am interested in all facets of metadata needed to discover, access, use, and understand data of any kind. Also evaluation and improvement of metadata collections, translation proofing. Ask me about the Metadata Game.



Tuesday January 23, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Stage 2

4:00pm

Anticipation, Action, Awareness: A PID Communications Template for All
PIDs will only ever achieve their full power when they’re widely adopted and used by the research community. But engaging with researchers about the value of PIDs can be challenging. During 2017, we completely overhauled ORCID’s education and outreach resources, collating and updating five years’ worth of materials that had been developed organically and reactively into a single clear and consistent collection. We also created a three-phase communications toolkit:

building anticipation about ORCID
engagement with ORCID (action)
ongoing ORCID brand recognition, and reinforcing key messages (awareness)

The toolkit can be used out-of-the-box, or modified to suit local needs. Although it’s ORCID-specific, it can easily be adapted for other types of PID, since all materials are CC0-licensed and may be re-used and customized as required.

In this session we will showcase the toolkit elements, share feedback from organizations that have been using them, and brainstorm everyone’s ideas for developing a broader PID toolkit in future (incorporating suggestions from the PIDcurriculum session at the last PIDapalooza).

Slides and activity outcomes are available on figshare: https://doi.org/10.23640/07243.5817669

Speakers
avatar for Alice Meadows

Alice Meadows

Director, Community Engagement & Support, ORCID


Tuesday January 23, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Stage 1

4:30pm

Closing Remarks
Encore

Speakers
avatar for PIDapalooza Organizers

PIDapalooza Organizers

PIDapalooza
Roadies from California Digital Library, ORCID, Crossref, and DataCite


Tuesday January 23, 2018 4:30pm - 4:45pm
Main Stage

5:00pm

Evening Reception
Evening Reception at Bau Bar: baubargirona.com (map)
Here are walking directions from conference venue to reception (15min).







Speakers
avatar for PIDapalooza Organizers

PIDapalooza Organizers

PIDapalooza
Roadies from California Digital Library, ORCID, Crossref, and DataCite


Tuesday January 23, 2018 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Box Office / Concession Stand
 
Wednesday, January 24
 

9:00am

Coffee Time
Box Office opens at 9:00

Speakers
avatar for PIDapalooza Organizers

PIDapalooza Organizers

PIDapalooza
Roadies from California Digital Library, ORCID, Crossref, and DataCite


Wednesday January 24, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
Box Office / Concession Stand

9:30am

Opening Remarks
Geoffrey Bilder is going to stir it up!

Speakers
avatar for Geoffrey Bilder

Geoffrey Bilder

Director of Strategic Initiatives, Crossref
Geoffrey Bilder is Director of Strategic Initiatives at Crossref, where he has led the technical development and launch of a number of industry initiatives including Similarity Check, Crossmark, ORCID and the Open Funder Registry. He co-founded Brown University's Scholarly Technology... Read More →


Wednesday January 24, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
Main Stage

10:00am

Metadata 2020: Harnessing PID-power for the greater good.
This session and discussion presents the work that Metadata 2020 is doing to help scholarly communities collaborate to achieve metadata sharing solutions. With this session, we aim to to advance discussions on how each community can best collaborate to solve specific issues. We will discuss the ways in which our efforts could be advanced, how to optimize usefulness to the wider scholarly communications community, and how our work can be crafted into an overarching Metadata Maturity Model.
Help us figure out how to connect the dots!

Speakers
avatar for John Chodacki

John Chodacki

Director, University of California Curation Center, California Digital Library - CDL
avatar for Chris Erdmann

Chris Erdmann

Chief Strategist for Research Collaboration, Libraries, North Carolina State University
avatar for Alice Meadows

Alice Meadows

Director, Community Engagement & Support, ORCID


Wednesday January 24, 2018 10:00am - 10:30am
Stage 1

10:00am

Cool stuff: Leiden Univeristy is mixing PIDs to build better context

Like many other academic institutions, Leiden University aims to ensure that the various entities that can be distinguished within the international ecosystem for scholarly communication, or Open Science, can be identified effectively and uniquely via PIDs. Within Leiden’s repository infrastructure, all academic publications and all digitised objects from the Special Collections department and are assigned Handles. The institutional data management policy stipulates explicitly that researchers ought to deposit their data sets in trusted data repositories which assign PIDs. As presented at the first PIDapalooza, a project was also conducted in 2017 to stimulate researchers to create an ORCID id, and to associate these identifiers with their research outcomes as much as possible. Although the ORCID project did encounter a number of difficulties, the various activities that were organized to raise awareness of the benefits of ORCID eventually led to a big increase in the number of author identifiers. Leiden University is currently incorporating these identifiers within its various information systems, in such a way that these identifiers can actually create added value, both for machines and for human beings. The various services that have been built on top of ORCID, for instance, can effectively help researchers to simplify administrative tasks. A large number of researchers at Leiden use their ORCID id to ensure that the data in the CRIS is accurate and up to date. To communicate the fact that these IDs are available, Leiden University is currently developing a visual system, in which the various types of identifiers are represented using specific icons. As one of the founding members of the IIIF consortium, Leiden University is also trying to embed object IDs and author IDs logically within IIIF manifests. The various identifiers that have been created can be used, moreover, to create network visualisations which display research results within their broader context. Such graphs can clarify, for instance, that publications are based on other publications, or that some data sets are connected to specific publications. Overall, these different activities can improve the visibility of research outcomes and they can ultimately enhance the impact of academic research.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Verhaar Verhaar

Peter Verhaar Verhaar

Leiden University


Wednesday January 24, 2018 10:00am - 10:30am
Stage 2

10:00am

Rethinking PID registration
In this session, I will propose a new workflow for PID registration that does not involve any API calls or web form submissions by the registering party. DOIs for science blogs are used as an example and good fit for this new workflow. We will have a working prototype by February and invite interested parties to bring their science blog for DOI-fication to the beta test we will then start.

Moderators
avatar for DataCite

DataCite

DataCite

Speakers
avatar for Martin Fenner

Martin Fenner

Technical Director, DataCite


Wednesday January 24, 2018 10:00am - 10:30am
Stage 3

10:30am

Open Refine cleans up messes
OpenRefine (formerly Google Refine) is a tool for cleaning up messy data, but it is also well-suited to cross-linking different identifiers through their metadata entries. I will share some experiences in using OpenRefine to interlink GRID, ISNI, Wikidata, and our own internal institution identifiers. This matching process also highlights metadata errors (including duplicates and incorrect merges) in the different sources, and can help improve data quality on all sides.

Speakers
avatar for Arthur Smith

Arthur Smith

American Physical Society


Wednesday January 24, 2018 10:30am - 11:00am
Stage 2

10:30am

Citations as First Class data objects - Citation Identifiers
Citations as First Class Data Entities, and Open CItation Identifiers

Citations, the conceptual directional links between citing and cited papers created by the inclusion of a reference in the reference list of the citing paper, are key elements in the scholarly landscape.  It is important to discuss citations now, because the Initiative for Open has persuaded almost all the major scholarly publishers to open the reference lists they submit to Crossref, so that Crossref now has about half a billion open references.

Citations need to be treated as first class data entities, so that they can be more readily described, distinguished, counted, processed and analysed.  I will present methods of permitting citations to be treated as first class data objects, that include:

     being definable in a machine-readable manner – requiring ontology modifications;

     being storable, searchable and retrievable – requiring a well-structured open database;

     being identifiable – requiring a new a global Persistent Identifier; and

    having a Web-based resolution service that takes the identifier as input and returns a description of the citation.



Speakers
avatar for David Shotton

David Shotton

Co-Director, Open Citations
David Shotton is Co-Director of the OpenCitations Project, a founding member of the Initiative for Open Citations, and one of the main developers of the SPAR (Semantic Publishing and Referencing) Ontologies, a suite of OWL-DL ontologies to serve the academic publishing domain. Originally... Read More →


Wednesday January 24, 2018 10:30am - 11:00am
Stage 3

10:30am

ConferencePIDs
This session is inspired by the CrossRef/DataCite group on Conference/Project IDs and will present the results achieved since the previous PIDapalooza till now. Read the CrossRef post for more info about the group: https://www.crossref.org/blog/taking-the-con-out-of-conferences/

Speakers
avatar for Geoffrey Bilder

Geoffrey Bilder

Director of Strategic Initiatives, Crossref
Geoffrey Bilder is Director of Strategic Initiatives at Crossref, where he has led the technical development and launch of a number of industry initiatives including Similarity Check, Crossmark, ORCID and the Open Funder Registry. He co-founded Brown University's Scholarly Technology... Read More →
avatar for Aliaksandr Birukou

Aliaksandr Birukou

Executive Editors, Springer
avatar for Martin Fenner

Martin Fenner

Technical Director, DataCite



Wednesday January 24, 2018 10:30am - 11:00am
Stage 1

11:00am

Break
Time for posters and socializing

Wednesday January 24, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
Box Office / Concession Stand

11:30am

Scientific & financial data: exploring PID-based bridges, or lack thereof
Come hear the tales of Thunken, a small R&D team with a fetish for PIDs.

Our projects focus on linking disparate documents (publications, patents, clinical trials, drug approvals, financial reports, etc.) across multiple sources to track innovations from early publications and patents to market data and financial statements. The natural separation of concerns between different stakeholders (e.g. the USPTO, the NIH, the FDA, the SEC, and the IRS in the US) has generated silos that are hard to break down and standardize.

We will present our methodology and explain how a failed project on automated patent valuation led us to create a new solution for unrefined altmetrics data, currently powered by data released by Wikimedia, StackExchange, and other sources.

Speakers
avatar for Luc Boruta

Luc Boruta

CEO, Thunken



Wednesday January 24, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Stage 2

11:30am

Identifiers.org - Compact Identifier resolution and services for data citation and annotation in biomedicine and beyond
Authors: Sarala Wimalaratne, Henning Hermjakob, and Jo McEntyre

Institution: European Molecular Biology Laboratory, European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire UK.

Abstract:
The Identifiers.org system uses Compact Identifiers to consistently support resolution of identifiers based on different systems such as URI, CURIE, DOI, ARK, ORCID, ISSN etc. Compact Identifiers consist of a unique prefix indicating the assigning authority and a locally assigned accession number (prefix:accession). They have been widely used for life sciences data for many years with great success. We have recently formalised Compact Identifiers to enable resolution support beyond the biomedical domain.

The Compact Identifiers are derived using information that is stored in an underlying Registry, which contains high quality, manually curated information on over 600 data collections. To support resolution of Compact Identifiers, a variety of information is stored in the Registry, which includes a unique prefix, a description of the data collection, identifier pattern, a list of hosting resources or resolving locations. When a Compact Identifier is presented to the Identifiers.org Resolver, it is redirected to a resource provider, taking into consideration information such as the uptime and reliability of all available hosting resources. For example, pdb:2gc4, GO:0006915, doi:10.1101/101279, orcid:0000-0002-5355-2576 etc. In addition, we have formally agreed with N2T resolver, based in California Digital Library to share a common prefix registry. This enable users to resolve Compact Identifiers using Identifiers.org (https://identifiers.org) or N2T (https://n2t.net/) resolvers. As Compact Identifiers and the resolving mechanisms of identifiers.org are generic, identifiers.org aligns well with other identifier systems and emerging requirements in the PID ecosystem.


Speakers
avatar for Sarala Wimalaratne

Sarala Wimalaratne

Project Lead, EMBL-EBI


Wednesday January 24, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Stage 1

11:30am

PID for PAP (pre-analysis plans)
Faced with well-known issues in the reporting of empirical studies such as “p-hacking” and the file-drawer problem, authors increasingly bolster the credibility of their finding by preregistering their studies and or providing pre-analysis plans (PAP). Several venues for pre-registration already exists (clinicaltrials.gov for medical studies, EGAP for political science, the AEA RCT registry for economics, and OSF across disciplines). Metadata standards for preregistration are barely existing. There is no way to systematically associate a preregistration with a published article or to easily query existing preregistrations for a given author. We develop a blueprint for a PID-based system that allows for the systematic citation of study preregistrations, as well as the linkage of preregistration to other digital objects (data, article) as well as researchers. We explore to what extent the existing DOI infrastructure can already accomplish this and where changes are needed.

Speakers
avatar for Sebastian Karcher

Sebastian Karcher

Qualitative Data Repository



Wednesday January 24, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Stage 3

12:00pm

Capturing facilities: PID recomendations for identifying scientific equipment and infrastructure
Scientific user facilities are specialized government-sponsored research infrastructure available for external use to advance scientific or technical knowledge.  Researchers compete for access to the specialized equipment and infrastructure at these facilities.  However, facility use is not captured in publisher workflows, making it difficult for the sponsor agencies and host institutions (typically government laboratories) to assess the scientific impact from these public investments.  This issue was discussed by the Society for Science at User Research Facilities (SSURF) at the first PIDapalooza meeting in Rekjavijk in 2016. In 2017, ORCID convened a group of publishers and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) user facilities managers to ascertain what data would help agencies and facilities to map impact, what PIDs would facilitate the description of the facilities, and how to enable collection in a manner that optimizes reporting of scientific impact. The Working Group is developing a set of findings and recommendations, which it will share with other facilities for comment in 3Q 2017.  A presentation at PIDapalooza would provide a venue to share what we learned, solicit comment, and encourage the launch of pilot implementation projects.  

Speakers
avatar for Laure Haak

Laure Haak

Executive Director, ORCID
I care about effective infrastructures for supporting open research, scholarship, and innovation. Talk to me about persistent identifiers, researcher involvement in managing their own information, ensuring credit for a wide range of contributions, and privacy. Or the Packers... Read More →
avatar for Crystal Schrof

Crystal Schrof

Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL)
avatar for Susan White-DePace

Susan White-DePace

Advanced Photon Source


Wednesday January 24, 2018 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Stage 1

12:00pm

What is driving adoption of person and organization PIDs in European CRIS systems
Dreams and realities of PID adoption in European research information management. A story of PID tactics.

Team members from OCLC Research, in conjunction with LIBER, have been examining the adoption and integration of PIDs in the evolving ecosystem of research information management in Finland, Germany, and the Netherlands.

In this presentation, I will share our findings regarding the dynamics around PID adoption, in particular incentives and barriers to adoption.
Are some tactics more successful than others? Come and find out.

Full report: https://doi.org/10.25333/C32K7M 

Presentation: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.5727011.v1

Speakers
avatar for Annette Dortmund

Annette Dortmund

Research Consultant, OCLC



Wednesday January 24, 2018 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Stage 3

12:00pm

Uniquely identifying organisations and people in anti-corruption contexts
This session will explore learning (and questions) from a number of open data for accountability projects. (1) The org-id.guide project is creating a collaborative 'register of registers' or organization identifiers, in order to improve the quality of open data about companies, government agencies and charities. (2) The Open Contracting Data Standard describes the need for contracting process identifiers, to tie together all the stages of government procurement and spending. (3) The Beneficial Ownership Data Standard project seeks to capture information on the links between companies and people, finding a global approach to identifying individuals, whilst respecting privacy, cultural and political differences.

Speakers
avatar for Tim Davies

Tim Davies

Co-Director, Open Data Services Cooperative


Wednesday January 24, 2018 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Stage 2

12:30pm

Lunch
Time for posters and socializing

Wednesday January 24, 2018 12:30pm - 1:15pm
Box Office / Concession Stand

1:15pm

The (ID) equivalency is in the eye of the beholder
Determining identifier equivalency is key to data integration and to realizing the scientific discoveries that can only be made by collating our vast disconnected data stores.
There are two key problems in determining equivalency - conceptual and syntactic alignment. Conceptual alignment often relies on Xrefs and string-matching against synonyms. There is indeed a better way! Algorithmic determination of identifier equivalency across different sources can use a combination of Xrefs, priors rules, existing semantic relations, and synonyms to create equivalency cliques than can highlight the discrepancies in conceptual definitions for manual review. This is especially useful for data sources annotated with concept drift and differences, such as diseases. Syntactic issues are that there are so many variations of the same identifier, making data joins difficult. We present a framework to reconcile and provide authoritative and integration-ready prefixed identifiers (CURIES), to capture and consolidate prefixes and to build links across key resource registries. The combination of JSON-LD context technology with a prefix metadata repository provides the basis for the infrastructure to handle identifiers in a consistent fashion. Finally, this architecture also allows resources to be self describing "beacons" with respect to their identifiers.

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Haendel

Melissa Haendel

Associate Professor, OHSU
Associate Professor | Interim co-director, Oregon Health & Science University Library


Wednesday January 24, 2018 1:15pm - 2:00pm
Main Stage

2:00pm

Event Data: Bridging persistent and not-so-persistent identifiers
Event Data is a new service from Crossref. It collects links from the web to items of Crossref and DataCite Registered Content. It describes new forms of scholarship beyond traditional publishing, and forms an underlying data-set that can be used for altmetrics, amongst other things. It records this data as a stream of links between pairs of URLs (e.g. Tweets, blog posts, Wikipedia pages linking to scholarly articles). Sometimes those URLs are DOIs, sometimes they are publishers' article landing pages. In doing this, it bridges the world of persistent identifiers and plain old URLs. I'll describe the service, pitfalls, the trends we tend to see, and why you'd want to use it.

https://www.crossref.org/blog/bridging-identifiers-at-pidapalooza/ 

Speakers
avatar for Joe Wass

Joe Wass

Crossref


Wednesday January 24, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Stage 3

2:00pm

Bridging the gaps between current practice and FAIR data
We have stories in the area of molecular sciences and particularly chemistry to tell. Since the online era started around 1994, scientists publishing stories in peer reviewed journals have had the option of including “supporting information” with their articles. In its present form (PDF files), this can be characterised as Unfindable, Inaccessible, Non-interoperable and not Reusable, the very antithesis of FAIR. Our stories are about how we set about to convert this mass of information and perchance even data, into a fit-for-purpose modern scientific resource. Absolutely central to the concept of FAIR was the PID and the metadata associated with it. To fully exploit this metadata, we decided we needed to create a repository designed to utilise the DataCite V 4 schema, having tried other existing repositories and largely failed to achieve our objectives. Our stories are built on the depositions into this repository over the last 18 months or so by increasingly motivated and engaged researchers. Doing so has enabled us to devise a rich variety of searches based on our metadata and we have even assigned PIDs to these searches to make it easier for scientists to try them out. Our stories will tell how this combination of FAIR data enhanced by rich searches are creating a new way of sharing scientific results and data across a broad swath of molecular sciences. Our stories still lack some kinds of information, such as PID+metadata for the instruments and software that is used to create our rich datasets and we look forward to the day when even more types of “research objects” will carry PIDs. You can see (interact with) the presentation at PID https://doi.org/ccs4

Speakers
avatar for Henry Rzepa

Henry Rzepa

Imperial College
I am a computational chemist (which means using computers to model chemistry and the behaviour of molecules) with an interest in how the Internet can be exploited to enhance the stories one can tell about chemistry.


Wednesday January 24, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Stage 1

2:00pm

PIDs for policy...yeah, like, putting IDs on individual elements within policies...cool, right?
Policies are a common way to structure interactions amongst humans as well as between humans and human-made systems. In turn, they have a structure to themselves, which may vary considerably across use cases but can generally be broken down into individual policy elements. In this session - which will be presented from https://github.com/Daniel-Mietchen/events/blob/master/PIDapalooza-2018.md - we will entertain the idea of assigning PIDs to such policy elements and explore the effects that might have on exposing policies relevant to a given context, flagging contradictions between policies, building policy-aware workflows, monitoring policy compliance, and standardizing policies across languages, jurisdictions and other use cases.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Mietchen

Daniel Mietchen

Researcher/Scholar/Scientist, Data Science Institute, University of Virginia
- Integrating research workflows with the Web - Engaging the research community and the public with open research workflows - Using open research workflows in educational contexts


Wednesday January 24, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Stage 2

2:30pm

Domination and submission: The struggle to retain ownership/control of national Research Information
Persistent Identifiers (PIDs) used in academic research live in two worlds: the world of open science and the world of strategic decision making. Whereas the objectives of open science aim to share as much as possible the resources and outcomes of publicly funded research, strategic management of research operates in the competitive space of attracting talent and winning funding grants.

This tension poses a particular challenge to mobilizing national sharing of research information. At present, academic publishers and related commercial service providers are poised to dominate the domain of Research Information. While the publishing industry provides many crucial services to the academic enterprise, the move to increased openness complicates this centuries-old relationship.

In this session, we draw on lessons learned from an ORCID pilot project to sketch a PID-centric Research Information strategy for the Netherlands.
 



Speakers
avatar for John Doove

John Doove

Program manager, SURF
Passionate about open science and how to get there. Involved in the past in stuff like Virtual Research Environments, Enhanced Publications, Open Access, Open Research information. Currently striving to build bridges in open science between innovation and practice on the one hand... Read More →
avatar for Clifford Tatum

Clifford Tatum

SURF
Clifford Tatum is a project manager at SURF, focusing on Research Information in general and ORCiD implementation in particular. He is also a researcher at CWTS, Leiden University, focusing on Open Science infrastructure in relation to emerging evaluation practices.


Wednesday January 24, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Stage 2

2:30pm

The Bollockschain and other PID hallucinations.
Every couple of years somebody in the suggests that we could replace existing persistent identifiers (e.g. DOIs, ORCIDs, etc) with some new technology that would fix some of the weaknesses of the current systems. Usually said person is unhappy that current systems like DOI, Handle, Ark, perma.cc, ORCID, etc. depend largely on a social element to update the pointers between the identifier and the current location of the resource being identified. It just seems manifestly old-fashioned and vaguely ridiculous that we should still depend on bags of meat to keep our digital linking infrastructure from falling apart. And it seems positively antediluvian that so much of this PID infrastructure is managed by a few centralised organizations. Wouldn’t it be great if we could create a “Scholarly Technology Universal PID?”

In the past, at least one of us has threatened to stab himself in the eyeball if he was forced to have the discussion again. But the dirty little secret is that we play this game ourselves. After all, the best thing a mission-driven membership organisation could do for its members would be to fulfil its mission and put itself out of business. If we could come up with a technical fix that didn’t require the social component and centralised management, it would save our members a lot of money and effort.

In this talk we will propose a framework that can be used when exploring new technology options for PID services. This framework, amongst other things, help to clarify exactly what is meant by notoriously slippery words like “distributed”, “risk”, “trust” and “ownership” and how they are used in different domains and for different applications. We will look specifically at so-called “blockhain” technologies and see how these terms are used and how they apply specifically in the context of PID systems for scholarly communication.

Moderators
avatar for Crossref

Crossref

Crossref

Speakers
avatar for Geoffrey Bilder

Geoffrey Bilder

Director of Strategic Initiatives, Crossref
Geoffrey Bilder is Director of Strategic Initiatives at Crossref, where he has led the technical development and launch of a number of industry initiatives including Similarity Check, Crossmark, ORCID and the Open Funder Registry. He co-founded Brown University's Scholarly Technology... Read More →
avatar for Martin Fenner

Martin Fenner

Technical Director, DataCite


Wednesday January 24, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Stage 1

2:30pm

PID-U-Like
The use of PIDs for journal articles, books, datasets, people and funders is now commonplace within publishing workflows and there are other initiatives underway such as grants, software and organizations. However, there are many entities that could be usefully associated with a PID and machine actionable metadata outside of these categorisations. Examples include a PID for work performed by someone at an institution (i.e. an employment record or study credit), a PID for a qualification gained at an institution (i.e. a degree or professional qualification record), or a PID for a research infrastructure facility, such as a high powered laser or research vessel. The potential use cases for PIDs are almost endless. We propose an on-demand service that enables PIDs to be created on demand, associated with domain appropriate metadata and persisted. This presentation will cover the issue, describe a flexible and metadata agnostic solution, demo a working prototype, and discuss how the community can make a Persisted and Identified Metadata as a Service (PIMaaS) service a reality.

Speakers

Wednesday January 24, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Stage 3

3:00pm

Break
Time for posters and socializing

Wednesday January 24, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Box Office / Concession Stand

3:30pm

Unsolved problems with PIDs and PID systems
The PID community has consolidated around a few key concepts: that PIDs are short, URI-compatible strings that are explicitly registered using a PID system, which maintains a database of such registrations; that PIDs carry some type and amount of associated citation metadata; and that PIDs resolve to URLs. So, are PIDs a solved problem? No! Here are four significant problems that remain unsolved. Solving them may require that the PID community collaborate to achieve newfound interoperability across PID types and systems, and to provide additional services beyond simple registration and resolution.

1. Are PIDs being used? How can we tell? That PIDs are being registered and assigned to resources is clear enough, but if a resource is cited or accessed via a local URL or other non-persistent identifier, then the existence of any PID it might have is pointless. This problem is exacerbated by the fact that the HTTP redirection mechanism exposes impermanent URLs to browsers and users, thus making it inevitable that such URLs will be bookmarked and subsequently used. Solving this problem may require work outside of PID systems proper, including web crawling and repository log analysis to detect resource references that could have been done through PIDs but weren't. Within PID systems themselves it may require providing additional services, such as facilitating reverse lookups (given a resource or URL, what PID(s) have ever been assigned to it?) and maintaining history of URL assignments (what has this PID ever identified?).

2. Who owns an identifier? Who may modify it? In the use case of a repository system that registers a PID for a resource it manages, the repository system is likely the "owner" in the sense that, should the repository move, it is the repository's responsibility to update the PID. But is it the sole owner? What if the resource author decides to move or copy the resource to a different repository? Who has rights to the identifier then, the old repository, the new, or the creator? Other use cases that involve institutions, libraries, departments, journals, and journal editors only add complexity. Some internet services, notably Wikipedia, have eschewed formal ownership models of resources, instead emphasizing the maintenance of history and the ability to undo change. Should PID systems adopt the same?

3. How can identifier aliasing, if not avoided altogether, at least be better handled? It is de facto common practice for repository systems to assign new PIDs to newly ingested resources regardless of the existence of any previously-assigned PIDs. This problem is particularly rife in the life sciences, where resources are often co-registered in multiple databases, receiving an identifier from each. The problem then, of course, is that having multiple, equivalent PIDs for a single resource sows confusion and dilutes citation metrics. At best, current PID systems record additional identifiers as "alternative identifiers," but this is far from sufficient and far from a universal practice. Solving this problem may require that PID systems maintain better and more comprehensive records of identifier aliasing (including aliasing that occurs across PID types and PID systems), and to support operations across whole "equivalence sets" of identifiers.

4. When a PID system itself moves or fails, what needs to persist? The awkward, but ultimately successful handover of the PURL system from OCLC to the Internet Archive should serve as a wakeup call to the PID community. While PID systems provide well-defined means of accommodating the movement of individual PID-identified resources over time, the movement of entire PID systems remains a very much ad hoc process. Must all the services and concepts of the old PID system be preserved? If not, which can safely be discarded? Note that the PURL system provided some unique characteristics in terms of user roles and resolution options. Solving this problem may require that standard models of PIDs and new forms of interoperability be adopted.

Speakers

Wednesday January 24, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Stage 2

3:30pm

Stories from the PID Roadies: Scholix
Scholix is not one of the PID Rock Stars. We are just a bunch of people trying to do stuff with PIDS; specifically link the PID of a dataset with the PID of piece of literature and say what the relationship is. How hard can that be? Bl**dy hard. This is the backstage view of PIDs from the Blood Sweat and Tears of roadies. And we have learnt a lot about persistent identifier types; resolving identifiers, URI vs non URI forms, what metadata is useful with a PID for our purposes, multiple identifiers for the same thing, de-referencing or not de-referencing PIDS and lots more.

Speakers
avatar for Adrian Burton

Adrian Burton

Australian National Data Service


Wednesday January 24, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Stage 3

3:30pm

developing PIDS in developing regions
PIDs are becoming more widely accepted in developing regions. The session will explore the application and use of PIDs for visibility and discoverability of research in the developing world. Particular focus will be placed on meeting the challenges in Africa and access to information. The world of open PIDs enables individuals to receive credit for their professional activities with low barriers of entry.

Speakers

Wednesday January 24, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Stage 1

4:00pm

Managing PID collisions
PIDs are increasingly being used to identify research resources - things that are used to perform a research study. There are as many types of research resources - rocks, antibodies, protein structures, natural history collections, databases, software applications… - as there are identifier types applied to them - DOIs, RRIDs, IGSNs, Accession Numbers… What is the purpose of a research resource ID? Is there enough similarity between the resource types to justify a common approach? Do collisions between identifier types affect adoption - such as PDB IDs and DOIs for protein structures? Or organization IDs and RRIDs for user facilities? To manage collisions, are additional infrastructural elements required? What principles or policies could be helpful in enabling different ID systems to co-exist?

Speakers
avatar for Laure Haak

Laure Haak

Executive Director, ORCID
I care about effective infrastructures for supporting open research, scholarship, and innovation. Talk to me about persistent identifiers, researcher involvement in managing their own information, ensuring credit for a wide range of contributions, and privacy. Or the Packers... Read More →
avatar for Kerstin Lehnert

Kerstin Lehnert

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Kerstin Lehnert, Chair of the EarthCube Leadership Council (December 2015 - May 2018), is Senior Research Scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University and Director of the NSF-funded data facility IEDA (Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance). Kerstin holds... Read More →
avatar for Maryann Martone

Maryann Martone

University of California San Diego
avatar for Sarala Wimalaratne

Sarala Wimalaratne

Project Lead, EMBL-EBI


Wednesday January 24, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Stage 3

4:00pm

The ideal persistent identifier world
At a recent THOR project event (https://project-thor.eu/) we asked delegates what an ideal persistent identifier world would look like. They described a world in which reliable, dependable PID infrastructures (with zero downtime) were constantly delivering tangible benefits, such as time and effort savings, to researchers and others. In this world we would never have to make the business case or argue for the value proposition of PIDs. We’d be too busy reaping the benefits of using them. Ultimately, what we would like to see is a world in which a network of PIDs and the relationships between them can be used to capture the whole web of connections between things. The creation of this graph demands both greater coverage and adoption of PIDs, current and yet-to-be-built. We will widen this discussion out with a follow-up session at FORCE 2017 in Berlin (https://www.force2017.org/) to discuss the current gaps in the PID web and to prioritize PIDs for content, resources or connections that would be of most immediate perceived value for the scholarly community. We'd like to bring the results of this discussion to PIDapalooza to present them to the identifier folks there, and discuss how we can work together to fill those gaps. Maybe there will be some new collaborations or business opportunities created, maybe we'll find that we haven't done as good a job of promoting our services as we may have assumed. In any case, it should be food for thought...

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Harrison

Melissa Harrison

Head of Production Operations, eLife


Wednesday January 24, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Stage 1

4:00pm

#ResInfoCitizenshipIs?
“A Research particle can only travel through a space created by its research information citizens” (1st Law of Research Data Mechanics)

In a research world where the descriptions of research objects including people, publications, grants, organisations and protocols are increasing enabled by persistent identifiers, multiple systems and institutions will have custodianship of a research records as they move through the research system. Persistent identifiers are not just technical, they are social. Yet for the most part, expectations and of how we should behave, and what we should do to our data for the benefit of other research citizens remains implicit at best. In November 2017, Digital Science (and anybody else that wants to join) will launch a twitter campaign designed to draw out community expectations of what research information citizenship is. This presentation will report back on the results of this campaign, and hopefully move us towards bringing research information citizenship out into the open.

Speakers
avatar for Simon Porter

Simon Porter

VP Academic Relationships and Knowledge Architecture, Digital Science
VIVO, Semantically enabling Figshare, GRID


Wednesday January 24, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Stage 2

4:30pm

Closing Remarks
Recap our Journey

Speakers
avatar for Carly Strasser

Carly Strasser

Director of Academic Alliances & Data Strategy, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center


Wednesday January 24, 2018 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Main Stage